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Writing Wednesdays

Writing Wednesdays

Learning the Craft

By Steven Pressfield
Published: July 22, 2015

If you and I want to be taken seriously as writers, it goes without saying that we have to study the craft. However we do it (read Aristotle, enroll in the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, study McKee and Coyne and Stephen King), we must learn the timeless principles of storytelling with the same thoroughness that a brain surgeon applies (we hope) before he starts drilling into our skulls.

Jackson Pollock. That's the fun of it, isn't it?

That’s the craft.

But there’s another, even more important element to this enterprise.

Our craft.

What I mean by “our craft” are those stylistic and storytelling instincts that are unique to you and me alone and that constitute our voice.

Hemingway. Faulkner. Chekhov. Toni Morrison. Tom Wolfe. Each of their styles is unique. Each possesses a perspective that is his or hers alone, and each has a way of telling a story that is unmistakable, one of a kind.

What’s your style? Can you define your voice? Can we pick a sentence out of something you wrote and say of it, “This could only have been written by you?”

If you and I want to take ourselves seriously as writers, we have to ask ourselves not just, “Am I studying the craft?” but “Am I studying my craft?”

I’ve written before in this space about my friend Paul and his struggles coming to grips with his gifts as a writer.

Right out of the gate, Paul had a distinct voice and a strong instinctive style.

1. His characters were dark. Very dark.

2. They were violent. Beyond-Tarantino violent.

3. Paul had no patience with “backstory.” You know the scene(s) that seems to be required in every novel or movie, where the protagonist reveals (or another device is employed to reveal) the “reason why” she or he does what they do? Paul’s instinct has also been to blow those scenes off. He doesn’t care why people do what they do. Or rather, he believes that the untold answer is more powerful than the told.

4. He hates “private moments.” These are scenes (often without dialogue) when the character is alone or in a non-public venue and, by some act or gesture that he or she believes no other human will witness, reveals some key aspect of their character. An estranged lover, for example, may call up on her Smartphone a saved text from her lost love, revealing by this act that she still cares.

Paul hates those moments too. He will never give you one.

5. He refuses to show any of his characters except in their in-action personas.

6. He refuses to “explain” or “ground” any of his characters’ actions.

Do you see what I’m getting at? Paul has instincts as a writer. These instincts are not the craft. But they’re his craft.

If Paul is going to realize his potential as a writer, he has to master both.

(These instincts may be wrong, by the way. They may be crazy or misguided or just plain dumb. But they also may be the seeds of a unique and unforgettable voice.)

Each of us has a natural style, just as Charles Bukowski did, or Eudora Welty or Hunter Thompson or Jean Rhys. Each of us has a view of life that’s ours alone—and an ear for dialogue and a style of storytelling that belongs to no one but us. Again, that’s not the craft. It’s our craft.
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FROM MAC McCALLISTER

From MAC McCallister

Mac McCallister is our "Agora master"—the key writer for the Agora blog. This list reflects works written by Mac, as well as works he recommends to others for reading.

WARFARE: ANCIENT AND MODERN

Warfare: Ancient and Modern

I know I've left out some great works on this list in particular. Consider it a work in progress, always being updated. If there's a specific title that you'd suggest adding, let me know.

ALEXANDER THE GREAT

Alexander the Great

Curious about Alexander? Not sure whether to start with the ancient texts or with modern biographies? My vote is for the old school, then head over to the boatload of excellent and very readable contemporary writings about Alexander.

CLASSICAL GREECE

Classical Greece

Penguin Classics and the Loeb Classical Library (which gives the text in Greek on one page and in English on the facing) are the indispensable sources. Pick any and you can't go wrong. But here are the must-reads.

ON WRITING

On Writing

These are just a few of the titles that I've turned to in the past, from authors whose work I admire.

FAVORITE FICTION

Favorite Fiction

This is the ultimate short list. Hard to decide, but these two are starting points.

GOLF

Golf

The title for this list says it all—golf.

BUSINESS AND MOTIVATION

Business and Motivation

Another short list—big on motivation.

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