Nobody Wants to Read Your Sh*t

Writing Wednesdays

Writing Wednesdays

Get Steve’s New Book on Writing … Free!

By Steven Pressfield
Published: June 22, 2016

[Forgive me for leaving this post up two weeks in a row, but response has been so overwhelming to this free offer (see below) that we’ve decided to keep it going till midnight a week and a day from now—June 30. That’s the expiration date. Don’t be late!]

 

As a thank-you to readers of this blog, we’re giving away the e-version of my newest book, Nobody Wants to Read Your Sh*t, just out today. No opt-in required. You don’t have to enter your e-mail address or compromise your privacy in any way.

Nobody Wants to Read Your Sh*t

The eBook is free, with no opt-in required.

The book is free until midnight Eastern time June 30.

What is Nobody Wants to Read Your Sh*t about?

The title comes from the first and most important lesson I ever learned as a writer, on the very first day of my very first job, as a junior copywriter for Benton & Bowles Advertising in New York. What the phrase means is that because readers are inevitably busy, impatient, easily-distracted, i.e. they don’t want to read your sh*t, it’s incumbent on you and me as writers to make our stuff so interesting, so sexy, so unusual, so compelling that a reader would have to be crazy NOT to read it.

Every other lesson in writing follows from this one tough-love truth.

Nobody Wants to Read Your Sh*t is my “lessons learned” from a career in five different writing fields—advertising, screenwriting, fiction, nonfiction, and self-help.

Some sample chapter heads:

Fiction is Truth

Nonfiction is Fiction

Sometimes You Gotta Be Somebody’s Slave

“Steve, Your Ego is Getting Out of Hand,”

Not to mention …

Three-Act Structure

Text and Subtext

How to Write A Boring Memoir

A Non-Story is a Story, and

Sex Scenes.

At the risk of hyping my own stuff, lemme say that Nobody Wants to Read Your Sh*t is a pretty good from-the-trenches primer for anybody who is a writer already or who has ambitions to become one.

Click here to download your free copy.

And thanks again for sticking with us here on Writing Wednesdays.
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FROM MAC McCALLISTER

From MAC McCallister

Mac McCallister is our "Agora master"—the key writer for the Agora blog. This list reflects works written by Mac, as well as works he recommends to others for reading.

WARFARE: ANCIENT AND MODERN

Warfare: Ancient and Modern

I know I've left out some great works on this list in particular. Consider it a work in progress, always being updated. If there's a specific title that you'd suggest adding, let me know.

ALEXANDER THE GREAT

Alexander the Great

Curious about Alexander? Not sure whether to start with the ancient texts or with modern biographies? My vote is for the old school, then head over to the boatload of excellent and very readable contemporary writings about Alexander.

CLASSICAL GREECE

Classical Greece

Penguin Classics and the Loeb Classical Library (which gives the text in Greek on one page and in English on the facing) are the indispensable sources. Pick any and you can't go wrong. But here are the must-reads.

ON WRITING

On Writing

These are just a few of the titles that I've turned to in the past, from authors whose work I admire.

FAVORITE FICTION

Favorite Fiction

This is the ultimate short list. Hard to decide, but these two are starting points.

GOLF

Golf

The title for this list says it all—golf.

BUSINESS AND MOTIVATION

Business and Motivation

Another short list—big on motivation.

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Gates of Fire
The War of Art
The Authentic Swing
The Lion's Gate
Turning Pro
The Profession
The Warrior Ethos
Do The Work
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The Afghan Campaign
The Virtues of War
Killing Rommel
Last of the Amazons
The Legend of Bagger Vance
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